Will you join me? New York City at 3 mph

Growing up on Long Island and then while attending college in New York City, I had the opportunity to enjoy many of the things that make the “Big Apple” an endlessly interesting and special place.

But it was not until several years ago that I was made aware of the opportunity to experience Manhattan in two very challenging and unique ways.

In a few months, I’ll again experience Manhattan in this very unique way. I’d love for you to join me. But first, read on.

Experience Manhattan by bike

Several years ago, my brother and I joined about 4,000 other cyclists and rode our bicycles in the New York City Bike MS event to raise funds for the many individuals (including our Dad) who struggle with multiple sclerosis.

The first year we participated, we rode about 30 miles on closed roads around the perimeter of Manhattan. The following year, a friend joined us, and we took an extended, 45-mile ride on (mostly) closed roads that included the ride around Manhattan and a ride through the Lincoln Tunnel to New Jersey and then back into Manhattan via the George Washington Bridge.

Experience Manhattan on foot

A few years ago, my mother-in-law made me aware of a chance to experience Manhattan in yet another unique way, through a Shorewalkers event known as “The Great Saunter.” Held the first Saturday in May, it’s a one-day, 32-mile walk around the perimeter of Manhattan.

The majority of the walk is along the Manhattan waterfront, including the Hudson and East Rivers, and traverses more than 20 parks. It begins and ends in Battery Park at the southernmost tip of the island.

On my first Great Saunter experience in 2015, one of my good friends from college and I joined 1,500 other walkers who set out early in the morning. Although my friend and I did not complete the entire walk, we did cover more than 25 miles! By late afternoon/early evening, more than half of the original group had completed the course.

It is amazing how different Manhattan looks and feels “from the edges,” rather than being immersed in the glass and steel canyons of the usual street grid. Highlights of the walk include stunning views of the Statue of Liberty and the New Jersey, Queens and Brooklyn waterfronts.

We walked under several bridges, including the Brooklyn, Manhattan and Williamsburg Bridges.  At the northern tip of Manhattan, we ate lunch at the base of the Little Red Lighthouse in Fort Washington Park, and we later passed through almost 200 acres of the beautifully wooded (and quiet!) Inwood Hill Park. At that point, it was difficult to believe that we were still in Manhattan!

Armed with an excellent map of the Great Saunter route, we were guided along the way by Shorewalkers volunteers, who also provided snacks, drinks and plenty of encouragement.

Preparing for The Great Saunter

If you’re anything like me, you won’t be able to undertake a 32-mile walk on the spur of the moment. To prepare for the Great Saunter, I added several long (six- to seven-hour) walks in the Syracuse area to my usual, regular daily walks. My favorite places to go for the longer walks are Green Lakes State Park, Onondaga Lake Park, and during those cold winter months, Destiny USA mall.

My challenge for 2019:  Walk AND bike Manhattan

I may have to do a little more training for my trip to New York this year. I recently learned of the annual Five Boro Bike Tour, a one-day, 40-mile ride that begins and ends in Staten Island on the first Sunday of May (the day after the Great Saunter).

As the name suggests, this event is a ride through all five of the New York City boroughs (also on closed roads), including a trip on the Staten Island Ferry and a ride over the Verrazzano Narrows Bridge. Each year, more than 30,000 people from around the world participate in the Five Boro Bike Tour.

So this year, I’ve made it my personal challenge to spend the first weekend in May in New York, walking in the Great Saunter on Saturday, May 4, and then riding in the Five Boro Bike Tour the following day, May 5.

Anyone care to join me? If so, please respond in the comments section below.

Flavorful Escarole and Pastina Soup

This delicious Escarole and Pastina soup includes many Italian flavors that remind me of my childhood. What little Ragazzo or Ragazzi didn’t grow up feasting on ingredients such as escarole, tiny pastina, and cannellini beans?

Alisa Fanara, my co-worker (and fellow Italian), shared this recipe. This soup is perfect for a wintery day. Add chicken or sausage to make the soup heartier.

Print Recipe
Escarole and Pastina Soup
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 1 hour
Servings
people
Ingredients
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 1 hour
Servings
people
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Heat oil in a large pot. Add onion, carrot and garlic, salt and pepper. Cook on medium-low heat until the onion is tender, about 8 minutes.
  2. Turn the heat to medium-high. Add the escarole and cook, stirring for a few minutes until the escarole is wilted. Add the broth, beans, and tomatoes. Simmer over high heat. Reduce the heat to medium-low. Simmer until the escarole is tender, about 20 minutes.
  3. Add the spinach and stir for a minute or two minutes until the spinach is wilted.
  4. Cook the pastina separately. Scoop pastina into the bowls. Ladle the soup on top of the pastina. Sprinkle with cheese. Serve the soup hot!
Recipe Notes

The recipe was adapted from the Los Angeles Times.

Sepsis: A deadly condition that happens fast

Something in Jean Hopkins’ gut told her to take her daughter to urgent care.

It was after school, and her 8th grader didn’t feel well enough for cheerleading practice. She had a slight fever, nausea and was tired. Her daughter said she felt like she did when she had a bladder infection.

Hopkins’ husband wondered whether they should wait until morning for the trip to urgent care.

Hopkins’ daughter, Riley

“But something in me told me she needed to go to urgent care now,” said Hopkins, of Rochester.

Her husband took their daughter to urgent care while Hopkins, a youth cheerleading coach, went to practice. By the end of practice, her husband called to say their daughter needed to go to the hospital.

Once in the emergency room, her daughter’s health quickly spiraled downward.

Her daughter threw up green bile that looked like antifreeze. She had dangerously low blood pressure that staff couldn’t control. By 4 a.m. her daughter was in the intensive care unit.

 

“It’s scary how quickly Sepsis can happen”

Hopkins’ daughter had Sepsis, a condition that can come on quickly and lead to death. Sepsis is the body’s extreme response to an infection. If not treated quickly, Sepsis can cause tissue damage, organ failure and death, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

According to the Sepsis Alliance, there are 1.7 million cases of sepsis and 270,000 deaths each year in the United States. The sepsis death toll exceeds annual deaths in the U.S. from breast cancer, prostate cancer and AIDS combined.

Hopkins’ daughter did recover. She spent a week in the hospital.

“It’s scary how quickly Sepsis can happen,” Hopkins said. “Just listen to your inner voice.  We were very fortunate that everything happened as it should. I don’t want to think about what could have happened if we didn’t take her right away to urgent care.”

 

Sepsis: Get treatment quickly

It’s critical that patients with Sepsis receive treatment as early as possible, said Gregory Carnevale, M.D., a chief medical officer for Excellus BlueCross BlueShield in upstate New York. Early treatment with antibiotics and large amounts of intravenous fluids improves your chances for survival, he said.

“Act fast and get medical care immediately if you suspect sepsis or have an infection that’s not getting better or is getting worse,” said Carnevale.

Barkley Klaiber of Syracuse said she’s grateful. She acted quickly when she didn’t feel quite right and had some abdominal cramping. Klaiber was 20-weeks pregnant with her second daughter.

Barkley Klaiber with husband Karl and daughters Sutton and Carson.

Normally, Klaiber would have waited a little before seeking treatment. She figured the cramping was related to kidney stones. She’s prone to getting them when pregnant.

But Klaiber had just been in a minor car accident a few days earlier. She thought she should go to the emergency room as a precaution.

Turns out Klaiber did have kidney stones, along with a bladder infection. But she had also developed a kidney infection as a result. Barkley went into septic shock after arriving at the hospital.

Barkley did recover after a 9-day stay.

“The car accident was a blessing,” she said. “Otherwise, I don’t think I would have gone to the emergency room as quickly. If I had gone into septic shock and I wasn’t in the hospital? I don’t want to think about what could have happened.”

Her daughter remained strong throughout the ordeal. “We just celebrated her second birthday,” she said.

 

Who gets Sepsis?

Anyone can get sepsis. But those at higher risk include babies and those with chronic conditions or weakened immune systems.

The elderly are also at high risk. Meg Thoin of Buffalo said her 86-year-old mother died of sepsis about a week after breaking her hip. She was in rehabilitation at a nursing home when her mom started suffering from diarrhea and confusion, and then nausea and vomiting.

Her mom was transferred to the hospital. She had kidney failure and had become septic. She died the next day, Thoin said.

“My hope is that others become more aware of what sepsis looks like, especially if you have elderly family members or if you know someone who is in a hospital or nursing facility,” she said.

There are a variety of warning signs associated with sepsis. The most common signs include:

  • Fever, shivering or feeling very cold
  • Elevated heart rate
  • Rapid breathing
  • Disorientation or confusion
  • Clammy or pale skin

“I was an educated person,” added Thoin, who is a nurse. “I knew what to look for, and I really wished I pushed harder for her to be tested when I started to notice certain symptoms.”

Excellus BlueCross BlueShield is proud to provide educational content regarding topics such as Sepsis. For more information, view our infographic on Sepsis.

 

Why every day is a good time to talk about breast cancer awareness

During the month of October, it’s difficult to ignore the stories, commercials, advertisements, pink T-shirts and other paraphernalia proclaiming Breast Cancer Awareness Month. For Excellus BlueCross BlueShield employee Maria Horton, however, every month and every day is a good time for breast cancer awareness.

Maria has learned that the hard way. She is a breast cancer survivor.

Maria Horton

 

An Otherwise perfectly normal mammogram

Due to a family history of breast cancer, Maria knew she was at high risk of also developing breast cancer. That’s why she started annual mammography screenings when she turned 40. Everything appeared normal for Maria up until three years ago.

It was just a few months after an otherwise perfectly normal mammogram that Maria noticed a change in one of her breasts. Not one to brush it off in ignorance in hopes that it will go away, she followed up with her doctor.

That led Maria to a ductogram and a core needle biopsy. When her doctor scheduled fine needle guided biopsies, the physician didn’t need to tell her she had breast cancer. “I already knew,” she said.

While her husband, three children and work family were aware of what was going on, Maria then had to break the news to her parents, siblings and in-laws. “This was very tough and very emotional,” she said. “I was numb.”

Once she shared the news, however, it was these same people who helped carry Maria through her 10½-hour bilateral mastectomy and reconstructive surgery. “Without the support of my loving family and the wonderful, caring people I work with, I don’t know how I would have gotten through all of my difficult days,” she said.

During her eight-week recovery, Maria’s family took care of her and helped with everything. Friends brought cards, food, flowers and her favorite Starbucks coffee.

“The support I had meant the world to me and still does,” she said.

 

Advice from a breast cancer survivor

Maria considers herself lucky in that she did not need follow-up chemotherapy or radiation. She does see her surgical and medical oncologists every three months and takes oral medication.

Her advice to all women is to know their personal risk factors for breast cancer, schedule their mammograms as recommended by their doctors and perform monthly breast self-checks.

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends that all women ages 50 to 74 be screened for breast cancer every two years, but an Excellus BlueCross BlueShield report shows that nearly one in five upstate New York women still does not get a biennial mammogram.

“The evidence is clear that early detection saves lives,” said Nicholas Massa, M.D., medical director, Excellus BlueCross BlueShield. “Given the fact that most health insurers cover preventive breast cancer screenings in full every one to two years for women older than age 40, we would like to see even higher percentages of women being screened for breast cancer.”

 

3 reasons  women skip breast cancer screenings

A recent Excellus BlueCross BlueShield survey of members who hadn’t had a mammogram revealed three top reasons why women opt out of their recommended screening:

 

1. Concerned about pain

Women who haven’t gone through menopause can minimize the pain and discomfort of having their mammogram by scheduling their screening a week after having their period, when breasts are less tender. Avoiding caffeine the week before your mammogram may also help. Take it from Maria, who offered this sage advice, “Yes, having a mammogram is uncomfortable, but it beats the alternative of having breast cancer.”

 

2. Concerned about test results

Mammograms can detect lumps in your breast when they are small, even before you can feel them. Breast cancer found early is easier to treat and results in better clinical outcomes. Generally, you can get your mammogram results within a day or so by calling your doctor’s office. There may be times when you receive a call from your doctor’s office recommending further testing. This does not mean you have cancer, but it is very important that you follow up if asked to do so. For Maria, it’s simple. “Do it!” she said.

 

3. Concerned about radiation

According to the American Cancer Society, the benefits of the small amount of radiation to which we are exposed during mammography screening outweigh any possible harm from radiation exposure. The peace of mind you’ll receive from having completed your mammogram is immeasurable, added Maria. “This takes a few minutes, and it’s done.”

Breast cancer can affect women of any age or race. Dr. Massa noted that your risk for breast cancer increases with age and if you have a family history. A woman’s risk factors determine when she should begin getting screened.

Learn more about breast cancer risk factors and screenings by talking to your doctor, or by visiting the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force website.

For more on the best ways to protect your health, read this Women’s Health Checklist from Excellus BlueCross BlueShield.

A Daughter’s Story: My Dad’s Life After A Heart Attack

When your 58-year-old dad drops to the floor and dies of a heart attack in a hospital emergency room, you take notice.

The event that triggered this wake-up call for Meghan Dailey of Rochester occurred seven years ago. She talks about it as if it just happened yesterday. It’s that fresh and real in her memory.

The heart attack: the scariest hour and a half of my life

The day started out pretty ordinary as typical workdays go. Meghan was working at Excellus BlueCross BlueShield in downtown Rochester. It was mid-October. It was one of those early fall days, when you just start noticing that the weather is getting a little cold.

What interrupted this otherwise unremarkable day was a call from her mom. She said that her father was in the emergency room at Unity Hospital in Greece. He had suffered a heart attack and collapsed right there in the ER. His heart had stopped beating. Doctors were trying to resuscitate him with chest compressions and the jarring shocks of an automated external defibrillator.

Meghan and her two sisters rushed to the hospital in time to witness their father’s revival. He was immediately wheeled in for surgery. The doctors inserted two stents to open up the clogged arteries in his heart.

“It was awful,” recalled Meghan. “Probably the scariest hour and a half of my life.”

He didn’t think he was having a heart attack

They sat in the waiting room with another group that was expecting word on their loved one. Meghan and her family never stopped praying even as they waited anxiously.

A doctor came in to tell the other group that their loved one hadn’t made it. Dailey thought their family’s turn would be next.

“Thankfully, our Dad made it through the surgery,” she said. “He was in the intensive care unit for another week and then was able to go home to recuperate.”

Meghan Dailey with her dad.

What’s not so unusual about this story is that Mike Schuth, Meghan’s dad, didn’t think he was having a heart attack. He thought the five- or six-hour pain he’d had in his shoulder was indigestion. According to his daughter, Mike decided to go to the emergency room only because he thought that’s where his doctor would send him.

Ever since Meghan could remember, she knew that her dad had high blood pressure. “Heart disease runs in the family,” she said. “My grandpa died of a series of heart attacks.”

The chef finds healthier ways to eat

Acknowledging that her father knew he should be careful with his health, Meghan is quick to point out that her father works as a chef.

On the job at Salmon Creek Country Club in Spencerport, he never thought twice about adding a little extra butter, heavy cream and Parmesan cheese to his fettucini dishes, or some additional salt to flavor his house specialty – steak with mashed potatoes.

“His favorite foods used to be linguini with white clam sauce, fish fries and macaroni salads,” said Meghan. Following the heart attack, his talent as a chef helped him find ways to modify the recipes he uses for himself and his family.

He’s learned to make more heart-healthy dishes without unnecessarily sacrificing quality and flavor. Scroll down to see his recipe for a lighter version of Alfredo sauce. Please add your heart-healthy recipes in the comments section below.

After a heart attack: walking, medication and golf

He watches what he eats and favors more fresh vegetables over foods like French fries But Mike also adheres to the medication regimen prescribed by his physicians to control his high blood pressure and high cholesterol.

He also started walking more. During winters spent in Fort Myers, Florida, Mike walks every day and golfs three times a week. Back home in Brockport, Meghan’s dad maintains the same routine.

Mike’s efforts at watching what he eats have paid off in spades. He lost 40 pounds in twelve months.

Being around for his grandchildren

Over the last couple of years, Meghan’s dad has gained added incentives to remain healthy. His three daughters have given him five grandchildren between them.

“There’s no doubt that he wants to make sure he’ll be around for his grandchildren,” said Meghan. “The kids adore him, and he loves being around them.” Her own two children range in age from 15 months to 3 years.

Since their father’s heart attack, the family recognizes the prevalent role that heart disease plays for them and keeps extra vigilant. “My sisters and I try to teach our children that veggies are an integral part of every meal,” said Meghan.

“We also try to maintain an active lifestyle and incorporate activities in everything we do,” she added. That comes in the form encouraging her daughter to pursue gymnastics, or to go outside to get some fresh air and play.

American Heart Association Rochester Heart Walk

One activity that the whole family, including grandpa and grandma, is actively involved in is the American Heart Association’s Rochester Heart Walk.

Meghan served as co-chair with Marty Cranmer, IT project manager, of the Excellus BlueCross BlueShield Rochester teams that participated in the walk. This year, the event was held in April at Frontier Field. Meghan and her family were there, supporting an event that raises money for what she feels is the best cause. With around 60 members on the Excellus BlueCross BlueShield team, the group raised close to $6,000 for the cause.

“I support the American Heart Association because my Dad and I are really close.” she said. “I’m so lucky that he’s still alive, and I feel blessed that he is.”

Heart-Healthy Recipe

Here is Mike Schuth’s recipe for heart-healthy Alfredo sauce.

Light Alfredo Sauce

¼ cup butter
1 clove garlic, minced
2 cups skim milk
1 package low-fat cream cheese
1 cup grated Parmesan cheese
Black pepper to taste

Melt butter in a saucepan over medium heat.

Add cream cheese and garlic to butter, whisking until melted.

Add milk, a little at a time, while whisking to smooth out lumps.

Stir in Parmesan cheese and pepper until smooth.

 

Lori’s story: How I lost more than 250 pounds

Lori Dyer had struggled with her weight for as long as she could remember. She was 412 pounds and had tried every diet. However, she always gained the weight back.

She got sick a lot and struggled to walk down stairs. The extra weight contributed to health issues, including high blood pressure, sleep apnea, pre-diabetes, back pain and knee pain.

“I didn’t know how not to be fat,” she said.

It wasn’t until Lori’s children said they “didn’t want to lose her” that Lori went through with a procedure that has so far has helped her lose more than 250 pounds.

(Click below to watch a video by Highland Hospital that highlights Lori’s story)

Gastric Bypass

Lori underwent gastric bypass surgery.

With the surgery, the doctor first makes the stomach smaller by stapling off a small pouch, which makes you feel full sooner. Next, the surgeon shortens your small intestine and attaches it to the small stomach pouch. This changes the direction of the food to bypass most of the small intestine so your body absorbs fewer calories.

When doctors look into bariatric surgery, they look at many options, including gastric sleeve surgery.

After gastric bypass surgery, patients need to rest and recover. After the operation, most people move from a liquid diet for a week, to a puree diet, to a soft diet where you can introduce other foods, to a balanced diet set out by a dietitian. These special diets run about two months before you are back to “normal” food.

Bariatric surgery is not a magic pill.

Lori said the surgery changed her life. But after undergoing such an intense procedure, Lori had to dramatically change a lot of things. She has to regularly take vitamins and supplements, eat healthy practically all the time, attend follow-up appointments, exercise and participate in support groups for the remainder of her life.

Lori says, “It is hard,” but her only regret is, “not having the procedure done sooner.”

Lori had at one point accepted where she was. She was 400 pounds and didn’t want to leave her house. Lori said her decision was hard to make.

“When I had thought about surgery in the past, I didn’t want to do it because I always figured I would be missing out on so much,” she said. “But then the light bulb finally went off and I thought ‘what am I missing out on by NOT having the surgery?'”

Lori realized that the answer was life. “When talking it over with my kids, my daughter said, ‘We really want you around as long as possible.’ So yes… absolutely. I was going for it.”

Considering Bariatric Surgery

Bariatric surgery is a major procedure, and should be part of a comprehensive program that includes exercise and nutritional education as well as mental health and well-being, said says LouAnne Giangreco, M.D., a Chief Medical Officer at Excellus BlueCross BlueShield.

If you are considering bariatric surgery, make sure you understand the side effects like infection, diarrhea, blood clots and even death.

“This type of surgery is only recommended if you’re very obese, your health is suffering and if all other diet and exercise options are not successful,” she said.

“Regularly eating healthy and exercising can have a bigger impact on your health than you think,” she added. “But, make sure you get the social support you need; having friends and family that support you is just as important as going through with the procedure.”

You may be able to look to your employer for support. According to Pat Salzer, a registered dietitian at Excellus BCBS, many workplaces provide health education programs at the work site.

“I am no longer just existing…I am living”

Lori wants people to know that bariatric surgery is not “cheating or the easy way out.” She stresses that “this is one of the hardest things I have ever done.” Lori found Highland Hospital in Rochester, a Blue Distinction Center for Bariatric Surgery. Hospital staff took care of her, educating her about the procedure and providing care before, during and after the surgery. These Blue Distinction centers help patients like Lori get back on their feet usually with fewer complications and hospital readmissions.

Lori has done things she never thought possible and is comfortable trying new things. Lori even went on a dating site last year and “found the piece of me that was missing. I totally would have missed out on him because I would have never put myself out there.”

Lori and Fred Shaughnessy

“Be ready for your life to change dramatically.”

Now, Lori is living her life the way she always wanted to. She is kayaking, mountain climbing, running 5ks and walking out the door, ready to take on her next adventure.  Lori stresses that the procedure “has certainly made, a huge, huge difference. It will affect everything you do, but in a good way.”

Lori with her kids, Mitchell and Rebecca

Lori’s Three Year Journey:

How to Stop Work from Killing Your Gym Motivation

It’s 8 p.m. on a gloomy Monday and you just had a long day at work. You finally finished cleaning up after dinner and are exhausted. Your feet hurt, you’re mentally drained, and all you want to do is sit on the couch and scroll through your Facebook feed or catch up with your latest TV show. You realize you wanted to get to the gym, but today just isn’t the day. You think to yourself that you’ll definitely go tomorrow because you’re going to bed “early” tonight.

This is the dangerous habit we let ourselves fall into. I like to call this the, “I’ll do it tomorrow” excuse.

Let me start this off by saying that I am an avid gym-goer. I enjoy going to the gym, sweating, and working hard. When I tell people this, their usual response is, “Well aren’t you lucky, I can’t even get myself off the couch,” or some sarcastic comment not too far off.

My friends then proceed to ask me how I do it (stay motivated). “Don’t you get sick of going to the gym?” My response to that is – well of course.

Getting motivated and staying motivated aren’t easy. The way I see it is a mind game.

I think naturally we all want a quick and easy fix to getting motivated and are all in search of the golden secret, but when it comes down to it, it’s about your own willpower and mental strength. If you are having a hard time getting motivated try these tips to step up your mental game:

1. Set a goal for yourself.

It’s important to know what you are working towards. Working out becomes a lot more motivating when you have a destination in mind and can visualize it. Start simple, set a goal to get in 10,000 steps a day and get to the gym at least once a week.

2. Find a Role Model.

Find influencers that speak to you and make you feel inspired. It’s great to see how others are getting motivated and pushing themselves. My personal favorites are Jill Christine, and Linn Lowes.

Side note: Just because your fitness role model may be on page ten of their fitness journey doesn’t mean they didn’t start from their own page one. Transformation photos can be fun to look at, but don’t get bogged down when you don’t see your own instant results after only a week. Keep pushing. We all have to start somewhere.

3. Change into Gym Clothes When You Get Home from the Office.

It’s one less step later in the evening. Maybe you still need to cook dinner or so some other chores around the house, but at least you’re ready to go. This takes away any possible ongoing battle you could have with yourself later in the night about getting ready or staying home.

4. Pep-Talk Yourself.

Don’t be afraid to give it a try. You can really amp yourself up with this one. Remind yourself that you are strong enough to do this and you will feel great afterward. Positive thoughts are key- don’t get in the way of yourself. Even try a power pose to boost your mental game and attitude.

5. Eat healthy Throughout the day.

Oftentimes junk food can make you feel bloated and sleepy. Your body will likely thank you for eating healthy and fueling it with the proper nutrients and a wholesome diet. Check out some of our recipes so you can change it up for yourself.

6. Listen to Music.

Roll down your windows on the way home from work and jam out to music that gets you energized. Create a gym playlist that has your favorite hits. Listening to upbeat music can really change your mood. Need inspiration? Try our Fearless Playlists.

7. Find a Gym Buddy.

Let’s face it, some days it can be hard to hold yourself accountable. One simple way to fix that is finding someone to work out with. Set goals together and make sure each is holding up on their end. Maybe even make it into a tiny competition.

8. Take a Power Nap.

Twenty to 30 minutes is the perfect amount of time to nap and wake up feeling productive again.

9. Get outside and Enjoy the sun.

The gym isn’t the only place you can get out and get active. There are plenty of outdoor activities to get your blood pumping and body moving. Grab a friend and get some fresh air. It’s good to find other sources of activity; the gym can become mundane and uninteresting. Keep it new and exciting for yourself!

Need more help? Check out these articles:

5 Tips for Cutting Soda from Your Diet

You drink over 38 gallons of soda each year.

According to the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI), that’s how much the average American drinks each year, which is equivalent to eight 12-ounce cans of soda each week. This statistic shocked me, too.

But it also opened my eyes to my own soda-drinking habit. I typically drink at least two Mountain Dews per day and sometimes it’s more than that. After reading this statistic, I did a little more research.

The reality of soda

The CSPI reports that a typical 12-ounce can of soda contains nearly 9 teaspoons of added sugars and a typical 20-ounce bottle contains 15.5 teaspoons of added sugar. While this may not seem like a lot of sugar, it is. To put it into perspective for you, the American Heart Association recommends a maximum daily intake of 6 teaspoons20 of added sugars for women and 9 teaspoons for men. This means that an average 12-ounce can of soda puts you at or above the recommended maximum daily intake of added sugars.

I don’t know about you, but that kind of blew my mind.

I have been drinking Mountain Dew regularly since I was in middle school. It’s probably contributed to cavities, stomach aches, and weight gain. I have tried time and time again to stop drinking it, but soda has a way of holding your affections. Mountain Dew is no exception.

I decided to track down the best ways to get rid of this habit. After doing a lot of research, I have come up with five tips and tricks for cutting soda out of your diet.

1. Start slow

You don’t have to quit cold turkey. Start by drinking less each day. If you usually drink two sodas a day, start by drinking only one.  The next week, try one soda every other day. And so on.

2. Set yourself up for success

If you don’t want to drink a lot of soda, then don’t buy a lot of soda. It doesn’t help if you keep putting it in your refrigerator. Take away the temptation and only buy the amount you are planning to drink. Another tip was if you only like to drink cold soda, then only put one in the fridge for the next day.

3. Find alternatives

It helps to fill the space that you’d be drinking soda by drinking something else. Drink water. If water is too boring for you, try flavoring it with fruit. Swap in coffee or tea if you’d like some caffeine. Flavored seltzer water may also be a good option if you like something with fizz. For many people, beverages can account for almost 20 percent of total calorie intake,  so it’s important that you find healthier alternatives. Plus, if you don’t find something else to drink, it will be that much harder to resist the call of the vending machine in the break room.

4. Exercise

If you drink soda for the caffeine, then try working out or simply getting some exercise to gain more energy along with some other great benefits. It’s much healthier for your body and has zero added sugars! Here are some great tips to help you replace your soda habit with an exercise habit.

5. Track your calories

If you’re a numbers person, it might be a good idea to sit down and track how many calories you’re drinking every day. Calories can be found right on the Nutrition Facts label. If you pay attention to the amount of calories you’re drinking, then you’ll see how quickly they add up. You could also track how much exercise you need to work off all the calories you’re drinking. The numbers may just motivate you to work harder on quitting. The MyFitnessPal app can be a useful tool to help with tracking calories.

After trying out all of these tips, the most helpful to me was finding alternatives. While I’d normally drink a soda with dinner, I’ve started drinking a glass of milk. When I’m thirsty at work, I drink water. Have any of these tips been helpful for you?

Still thirsty? Check out Is Diet Soda Healthier than Regular Soda?

Myth-Busters: Common Misconceptions About Food Labels

Jamie Moore is the Director of Sourcing and Sustainability at Parkhurst Dining. Moore is passionate about teaching people about common misconceptions about the labels we find on our food. He shares his guidance and tips on what to know about food labels.

Fact vs. Fiction

Food labels are designed to help us better understand our food purchases. However, according to Moore, a government agency does not regulate all of the claims on a food label. Without regulation or strict standards, some of these labels can, therefore, be misleading, he said. Most consumers don’t know the true meaning behind many of these labels and may purchase food thinking that the label means more than it does. Here are five common food labels that may be misleading you.

1. Cage-Free

It is generally thought that “cage-free” eggs come from a hen who lived outside of a cage.  However, according to Consumer Reports’ Greener Choices, seeing a “cage-free” label on eggs does not guarantee that hens were raised outdoors or even in large open spaces. In reality, most “cage-free” egg-laying hens were raised in hen houses where each hen has a space of about 8 inches by 8 inches.

Similarly, when “cage-free” is on a meat label, it may be thought that these animals are not raised in cages, but that doesn’t mean the animals don’t live in close quarters. For example, many “cage-free” chickens are raised in large, open structures called “grow-out houses”. These houses typically hold tens of thousands of chickens, and each chicken is given less than a square foot of space (about 10.5 inches by 11 inches per chicken).

Variation exists in what “cage-free” means because the “cage-free” claim is only verified sometimes. For example, while this label on eggs is supposed to be regulated by Food and Drug Administration (FDA),  the farms are not always inspected to verify the type of “cage-free” environment that the hens have access to.

2. Pasture-raised

When you see the label “pasture-raised,” you may picture animals who spend all day living in an open field, grazing on grass. According to Consumer Reports’ Greener Choices, however, a “pasture-raised” label on meat, poultry, dairy or egg products only means that the animals were raised for at least some portion of their lives on a pasture or with some access to a pasture. For example, “pasture-raised” dairy cows are given some access to a pasture, but primarily housed indoors and raised on a diet of hay, corn, and soy, not grass.

When it comes to dairy and eggs, there is no common standard for what “pasture-raised” means. This means that producers can decide the size, quality and access standards to the pasture. When it comes to meat and poultry, producers are required to explain what “pasture-raised’ means for their products. However, the USDA allows the producers to make their own definition of what it means. Producers do not necessarily have to stick to the same standard.

3. Free-Range

Much like “pasture-raised”, “free-range” hens and chickens are generally thought to have free access to the outdoors. However,  Consumer Reports’ Greener Choices explains that there are no standard requirements for the size or condition of the outdoor area that these animals have “free-range” in. Therefore, products can be labeled “free-range” as long as birds are given some kind of access to the outdoor area. Producers don’t have to report how accessible the area is to the birds or how often they are given access.

On beef products, the “free-range” label means that the animals were given free access to the outdoors for at least 120 days each year.  Again, there are no requirements for the size of the outdoor space or the quality of its condition. Like “pasture-raised”, “free-range” also doesn’t mean that the animals only at the grass on a range.

These products are only verified sometimes by the FDA and the Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS).

4. Locally-Grown

“Locally-grown” is a label that is not legally regulated. That means there is not a standard definition for what “locally-grown” means.

For example, when you hear about “locally-grown” produce, you may think the produce is grown right down the road. In reality, the produce could be grown 40, 60, or even 100 miles away. Producers can define what is “locally-grown” based on their own mission and circumstances. When you see that something is “locally-grown”, ask about what is “local” to that producer or grocer to learn more about where it came from.

5. Natural

The USDA defines this label as a product containing no artificial ingredient or added color and is only minimally processed. According to Consumer Reports’ Greener Choices, this label is not verified. This means that there are no consistent standards to ensure that the label means what it implies to consumers. “Natural” is a label that companies can define for themselves and the definitions vary. Government agencies do not regulate the use of the “natural” food label, they can only provide guidance.

Organic food, on the other hand, is held to very rigorous standards. To learn more about the difference between “organic” and “natural” food labels, check out our article, What’s the Difference Between “Organic” and “Natural”?

Learn Before You Trust the Label

Moore emphasizes that many food labels can be confusing when there is a lack of regulation or standards for what a label means. That’s why it is important to learn more about the meaning behind a food label. By doing a little research or talking to experts like Moore, you too can be a more informed consumer at the grocery store.

If you’re interested in buying a product that truly has verified claims for things like having access to a pasture or being grass-fed,  Consumer Reports suggests looking for additional labels on the product. Some food labels are strictly regulated and provide meaningful standards for things like free access to the outdoors. These labels include:

 

15 Ways to Stop Stress Now

You’re stressed. But you don’t have to cruise to a tropical island to relieve your stress or anxiety. Here are some simple ideas to get you out of your rut:

  1. Drink a cup of hot tea.
  2. Breathe … deeply.
  3. Step outside. Breathe in the fresh air.
  1. Have lunch with a co-worker, friend or family member.
  2. Doodle.
  3. Listen to music.
  4. Walk!
  5. Plant-ify your house or workspace.
  6. Stand and stretch. Every hour.
  7. Praise others.
  8. Smile! Try a full-fledged smile that leaves crinkles around the eyes.
  9. Erect a “wall of inspiration” in your work area.
  10. Clean up your house or workspace.
  11. Skip work email. Talk in-person or over the phone.
  12. Set work meetings for 45 minutes (instead of one hour). More time between appointments!

More Stress-Free Inspiration

Read 12 Ways To Workout On The Cheap and 50 Small Changes For A Healthier Life.